by J. Rae Chip

Ok so this is a blog post about fake blood, so it should be common sense, but just in case...
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"The regret of a killer" Model: Kaitlyn Roberts Set: Linda Vista Community Hospital / set of SAW IV. This image contains many different forms of fake blood, which is why it is used as an example.
This blog post contains recipes for some fake blood as I use for photographic purposes. I get a lot of questions about it, so I decided to post about it.

All our recipes are edible.

First of all, why would you want fake blood to be edible? Well... if you're shooting a vampire, you might want him or her to be able to actually lick the blood off someone else. Additionally, if you're using the blood anywhere near the face of the model, you want it to be edible and chemical free. Lastly, because our company tries to be eco-friendly, it is our goal to use very few chemicals.

Blood for faces (makes about 30 milliliters or about 2.5 tablespoons)
This recipe is sticky and clumpy.

Mix about 15 ml (or 1 TSP) of corn starch, about 5ml (or 1 tsp) of cocoa powder, and about 15 ml (1 TSP) of red food coloring.
Then use a turkey baster to add small amounts of water until the blood reaches a ratio of stickiness that you are satisfied with.

If you're just going for a safe blood mix and want to prevent your model from licking off the blood, you can use unsweetened chocolate or ground coffee instead of cocoa powder. It's safe for consumption, but nobody wants to!

Blood for floors and walls (makes 10 liters or 3 gallons)
This recipe is sticky, but it is not clumpy.

Mix 4 liters (about a gallon) of white corn syrup with about 2 liters (about half a gallon) of red food coloring and about 1 1/3 liter (1/3 gallon). Add a desired amount of onion flakes of various sizes to be skin or other matter. You can use pieces of clay for brains. Slowly add about 500 ml (or 1 pint) of corn starch to thicken your blood. Stop if you reach the consistency you want.

If you want a really realistic formula, add an extremely cautious amount of blue food coloring. Arterial blood is red, while venous blood is blue.

Blood for sand / soft floors (makes about 22 fluid ounces or 650 ml)
This recipe mixes with the dirt a little bit, and the ground looks like it has been recently covered with blood, which is now soaking in.

Mix an entire bottle of ketchup with a desired amount of onion flakes and about 1/4 cup (about 62 ml) of chocolate syrup. You can also cut up a tomato into small pieces and then hit them with a meat hammer. That will give you some more innards for your blood.

Blood for large wounds (beta)
Mix a box of red jell-o, about a TSP (15 ml) of jam or jelly, and 1/5 of a packet of powdered gelatin. Slowly add warm glycerin until the desired consistency is reached. Add red food coloring until you reach the desired color of red.

Blood and pus mix (beta)
Put aside a mixture of about 1 TSP (15 ml) of creamy peanut butter and 1 tsp (5 ml) of water. Mix about 2 TSP (30 ml) of white corn syrup and 1 tsp (5 ml) of chocolate sauce (the liquid, not the powder). Loosely mix together the peanut butter mix and the fake blood mix so that they are still separate but also blended.

Blood for spatter or active arterial wound (beta)
Mix about 2 TSP (30 ml) of soy sauce with a desired amount of red food coloring. You can suck this up into a syringe to spray it around.
 


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